Tag Archives | strategy

Park and Dibadj Consultancy

Douglas Park of Park and Dibadj Consultancy

Douglas Park

Douglas Park and Reza Dibadj have launched their boutique business and legal consultancy, Park and Dibadj (P&D)—a unique firm that addresses unmet needs in corporate strategy and governance. We bring decades of successful experience as both lawyers and strategists in extraordinarily challenging environments.

We believe that a siloed approach—law on the one hand, business on the other—cannot adequately address the most pressing problems of corporate governance and strategy. As such, we develop business strategies and also implement transactional structures and substantive legal arguments.

Reza Dibadj of Park and Dibadj Consultancy

Reza Dibadj

Our experience practicing, consulting, and teaching both business law and strategy allows us to address two critical issues that companies face: corporate development and mitigating legal, operational, and financial risks to organizations and their directors and officers.

Corporate Development

With respect to corporate development, Park & Dibadj:

  • Collaborate with domestic and international business entities that seek financing strategies that do not require securities registration.
  • Advise on mergers & acquisitions, including identifying targets, contractual structures, appraisal rights, and due diligence to maximize the chances of a successful deal.

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Value Creation Thinking: Review

Value Creation ThinkingWhile primarily concerned with explaining value creation thinking and the life-cycle valuation framework, the book also delves into context, specifically how Bartley Madden views evolved.

I find his work compelling, at least in part because he shares my interest in understanding the world from the bottom up, instead of top down. Additionally, he focuses attention on “how we know what we think we know,” which takes me back to my studies in the sociology of knowledge. I am less sure about his embrace of systems theory but he deploys that tool well in the context of analyzing firm performance.

Value Creation Thinking: On Capitalism

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Review: Strategy, Innovation and the Theory of the Firm

teece_david

David J. Teece

StrategyInnovationDavid J. Teece’s Strategy, Innovation and the Theory of the Firm uses a couple of dozen papers to explore his own scholarship and that of his co-authors on strategy research and innovation as the engine of growth. He develops the “Dynamic Capabilities Framework” – how the various streams of research on management and innovation converge, the framework and derivative theories are tested and how they can be developed into a capabilities-based theory of the firm. Continue Reading →

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SVNACD Event – Corporate Boards: Strategy, Not Just Operations Review

Bob Frisch photoBob Frisch is the managing partner of Strategic Offsites Group. He has more than 29 years of experience working with executive teams and boards worldwide on their most critical strategic issues. He has published three articles on teams and decision making in the Harvard Business Review: “Who Really Makes the Big Decisions in Your Company” (12/11), “When Teams Can’t Decide” (11/08) and “Off-Sites That Work” (6/06). Bob’s work has been profiled in publications from Fortune to CFO to the Johannesburg Business Report. He is a regular contributor to Bloomberg Business Week and The Wall Street Journal and his blog appears at HBR.org. Continue Reading →

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Moving Corporate Governance Out of the Fraternity House

Perhaps it takes the mass media to illustrate the skewed focus of corporate law. Here we have the [at least for now] CEO of Tribune Company, Randy Michaels, under fire for a lot of superficial things, such as an alleged frat house atmosphere in the company, while his role in the company going into and staying in bankruptcy during his three year tenure wasn’t enough to bring about such scrutiny or cause the board concern about its own exposure. It took a misstep by one of his subordinates in circulating an offensive video and public disclosure of a ‘frat house’ atmosphere to bring things to this point. (Tribune Co. CEO Randy Michaels: I have not resigned, Chicago Tribune, 10/19/2010)

But sources said board members were concerned that Michaels had publicly embarrassed an iconic Chicago institution, made many of its employees uncomfortable, and had aggravated an already-tortuous 22-month-old bankruptcy process at a highly delicate stage.

In light of those issues, board members also were becoming concerned that the behavior of Michaels and his management team might open them up to legal action over their fiduciary duty to protect the company, the sources said.

To be clear: the juvenile hijinks are wrong, probably illegal and ill-befitting of an executive of a major public company. However, they and the public embarrassment and employee discomfort are a peripheral matter in the grand scheme of things and have nothing to do with return to shareholders, or in this case, creditors, which should as a matter of law, be the board’s focus. Something is wrong with a scenario where a board is motivated to act in accordance with its fiduciary duty only when raucous behavior comes to light, and had no such motivation in the face of poor financial performance resulting in a protracted bankruptcy, and drastic loss of market share.

Something needs to be done about our corporate law environment when CEO’s who have enough sense to avoid personal indiscretions (or keep them private) get a pass on poor strategy or execution, and their performance is subjected to real scrutiny only when juvenile antics come into public view. Similarly, boards should have at least as much legal exposure when they don’t hold management accountable for a lousy job with their core functions as when they don’t react to personal level foolishness.

It’s a curious legal environment indeed when an HP CEO who presided over a doubling of shareholder value and a Tribune CEO who presided over a bankruptcy filing and deterioration of business value during the process suffer the same fate on account of extracurricular personal indiscretion. It’s also a reflection of a system that needs drastic updating to take substantive performance into account as part of directors’ fiduciary duty.

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