Tag Archives | Amalgamated Bank

AFL-CIO Key Votes Survey Results for 2012

Vanguard, Northern Trust, BlackRock and Fidelity scored the lowest among researched funds in supporting AFL-CIO endorsed proxy issues in 2012, according to their 2012 Key Votes Survey. Calvert, Amalgamated Bank, McMorgan and Bridgeway scored the highest.

On proxy-voting issues at 32 companies the AFL-CIO considers representative of a “worker-owner view of value that emphasizes management accountability and good corporate governance,” Vanguard voted against all 32 proposals; Northern Trust, 28 out of 29; BlackRock, 30 out of 32; and Fidelity, 28 out of 30. Continue Reading →

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Walgreens (WAG): How I Voted – Proxy Score 24

Walgreens ($WAG) is one of the stocks in my portfolio. Their annual meeting is coming up on 1/9/2013. ProxyDemocracy.org had collected the votes of four funds when I voted on 1/1/2012.  I voted with management only 24% of the time.  View Proxy Statement. Warning: Be sure to vote each item on the proxy. Any items left blank will be voted in favor of management’s recommendations. (See Don’t Let Companies Change Shareholders’ Blank Votes)

I generally vote against pay packages where NEOs were paid above median in the previous year but make exceptions where Continue Reading →

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15th Proxy Access Proposal of Season Filed at Nabors

Bermuda-based energy-drilling contractor Nabors Industries Ltd., already being sued by shareowners over executive pay issues now faces a proxy access proposal filed by CalSTRS and nine public pension funds from Connecticut, Illinois, New York and North Carolina. The company’s stock has lost about a quarter of its value this year. According to New York City Comptroller John C. Liu, who submitted the proposal on behalf of the City’s five pension funds,

Expropriating the corporate treasury to fund egregious CEO pay packages at the shareholder’s expense is both a symptom and a consequence of Nabors’ entrenched board. The only way to fix a recalcitrant board is to enable shareholders to elect directors other than those nominated by that same board.

According to a press release from CalSTRS, the funds are part of a larger group of 11 public funds that called upon the Nabors’ board in a September 29 letter (PDF; 61KB) to Continue Reading →

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Turned Down at WFMI Again: Still, There is Progress

John Chevedden helped me draft and defend a resolution at Whole Foods Markets that requests the Board to adopt a policy establishing an engagement process with proponents of shareowner proposals supported by a majority of the votes cast, excluding abstentions and broker non-votes, at any annual meeting. It seemed like a rather straight-forward and simple request to me.

If shareowners vote in favor of a proposal and the board doesn’t implement it, such as the simple majority-voting proposal which won our 57%-support at our 2009 annual meeting, Whole Foods would set up an independent board committee, schedule a telephone meeting with the proposal proponent, and would present the proposal with the committee’s recommendation to the full Board.

Well, I guess this type of proposal is a little new or maybe I’m viewed as a bomb-throwing radical by some for proposing that a company at least discuss a shareowner proposal with the proponent before deciding not to implement it after it is passed by a majority of votes cast. The proposal only got 39% of the vote.

Another simple-majority voting proposal this year from John Chevedden won 58% this year. Will they ignore it again?

The proposal for CEO succession planning from the Central Laborers’ Pension Fund fared worse, only got 30% of the vote. Even living on a diet of whole foods, Mackey won’t be forever. Isn’t it good to plan ahead?

In addition to passing a second simple-majority proposal, shareowners also approved a resolution from Amalgamated Bank’s LongView Funds would roll back a bylaw change that Whole Foods directors put in place a few months after the SEC closed an investigation into the online chat activities of  John Mackey in April 2008. The proposal would permit sharewners to remove a director either “with or without cause.”

When they lowered their standards to with cause only, the board redefined “cause” narrowly as covering only a criminal indictment or a judicial finding that a director had breached his or her fiduciary duties to the Company or was not capable of performing a director’s responsibility.

I’m glad to see this proposal won 53% support. “We are pleased that investors have supported this call for the Board to reinstate fundamental shareholder rights,” said Scott Zdrazil, Director of Corporate Governance for Amalgamated Bank. “We encourage the Board of Whole Foods to be responsive to shareholders and to take the necessary steps to implement the proposal.”

All the proposals were reasonable and deserve full consideration by the board.

When Mackey was pretending to be someone else in the Yahoo! chat room, he said shareowner proposals turn annual meetings into “a circus.” Yet, I understand, it was Whole Foods employees who applauded management and heckled at least one shareowner for speaking during the Q&A portion of the meeting. Did Canadians suddenly become less polite after the Olympics (the meeting was held in Vancouver) or were these imported Americans, specially trained by Mackey in how to misbehave?

In part, I’m teasing but I also believe shareowners should be treated with respect. Discussing the issues should be a major portion of any annual meeting, especially one like WFMI, which has chosen to ignore the expressed will of the owners.

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