Tag Archives | Charles M. Elson

IRRCi Joins Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance

IRRCi has a new home! The Investor Responsibility Research Center Institute (IRRCi) announced that it has selected the John L. Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance (Weinberg Center) at the University of Delaware as its successor organization. The Weinberg Center will receive a grant from IRRCi in excess of $1 million as part of the successor transition.
With these funds, the Weinberg Center will materially expand its environmental, social, corporate governance and capital market research, and also maintain the full IRRCi research library so that more than 75 research reports remain publicly available at no cost. The Weinberg Center also will continue to fund and manage the annual IRRCi Investor Research Award that recognizes outstanding practitioner and academic research.

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Compensation: The Difference it Makes

Compensation:  The Difference it Makes

Compensation. Most Americans think CEOs of the 500 largest publicly traded corporations are overpaid, even though they think CEOs made less than a tenth of what they actually earn. The Rock Center for Corporate Governance at Stanford University conducted a nationwide survey of 1,202 individuals — representative by gender, race, age, political affiliation, household income, and state residence — to understand public perception of CEO pay levels among the  Key takeaways are:

  • CEOs are vastly overpaid, according to most Americans
  • Most support drastic reductions
  • The public is divided on government intervention

Americans and CEO Pay: 2016 Public Perception Survey on CEO Compensation found 74% believe that CEOs are not paid the correct amount relative to the average worker. Only 16% believe that they are.

A brave panel tackled the topic, Compensation: The Difference it Makes, at the Corporate Directors Forums I attended in San Diego last month. Like all Corporate Directors Forums, this one operated under the Chatham House Rule, so you will not find any direct quotes below. These are my notes on Compensation: The Difference it Makes. As such, they include my opinions as well observations made by speakers panelists and others in attendance at the Forum. This is certainly not a transcript. However, I hope even those who attended the Forum will find the post useful, especially my attempt to provide additional context through links and commentary. Continue Reading →

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LeBlanc on Key Steps to an Effective Board

Dr. Richard LeBlanc

Dr. Richard LeBlanc

A North American board governance guru, Dr. Richard LeBlanc is put on the hot seat to discuss key steps to creating a great board—and how investors can know how effective their board really is. LeBlanc and host TK Kerstetter talk about board leadership, board assessments, board recruitment and composition.Inside the Boardroom by Richard LeBlanc

Kerstetter also quizzes LeBlanc about his book, Inside the Boardroom: How Boards Really Work and the Coming Revolution in Corporate Governance. The two discuss his predictions and whether a corporate governance revolution he projected in 2005 actually transpired. Continue Reading →

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Directors&Boards: Digital Advisors & Knowledge Capture

Directors&BoardsDirectors&Boards is one of our “stakeholders.” No, that doesn’t mean they own part of us or that we own part of them and it doesn’t mean we always agree with each other. But they are included in our primary reference groups, those who contribute regularly to our “vocabulary of meaning.” The current edition begins to address two topics that need more attention. Continue Reading →

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Directors Forum 2014: Morning Sessions

Kroc-School-of-Peace-and-Justice-University-of-San-DiegoBelow are some notes I took during the morning sessions at the Corporate Directors Forum 2014, held on the beautiful campus of the University of San Diego, January 26-28, 2014. This year, I was only able to attend on January 27th. The program was subject to the Chatham House Rule, so there will be little in the way of attribution below but I hope to provide some sense of the discussion. Continue Reading →

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Take Action: Comments on SEC Pay Ratio Rulemaking Due December 2

I-Want-Your-OpinionLast week the SEC finally proposed rules to require public companies to disclose the pay ratio between their CEO and their employees, as mandated by Dodd-Frank. Companies would have to disclose the ratio between CEO compensation and the median pay of their employees. Update: Comments due December 2nd.

As reported by the WSJ,  the ratio of “average” pay jumped from 51.6 in 1981 to 319.7 in 2011, according to data compiled by Kevin Murphy of the University of Southern California. The AFL-CIO sampled S&P 500 firms and claims the ratio went from 42 in 1980 to 380.

In response to complaints from multinationals that tallying pay for workers around the globe would be prohibitively expensive, the SEC’s draft largely leaves estimating and sampling methodology up to individual companies. Continue Reading →

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2013 Millstein Forum: Dual-Class Structures, Pro and Con

Sorry to be late and abbreviated in getting out my coverage of this great forum. Be sure to check out the Forum’s photo gallery, which contains many more and much better shots than what I took between notes and conversations.

The second panel discussed the growing issue of dual-class stock structures. While there was considerable debate, my sense is that most in the room see the advantages of such structures do not outweigh the disadvantages. I would like to see more discussion in the broader press about these issues when dual-class companies are going public. Maybe the discount would be even steeper. Continue Reading →

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Deemphasizing Peer Groups: What’s Next?

There is nothing more controversial than setting the pay of America’s CEOs.  11:45 a.m., March 22, 2013–The John L. Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance at the University of Delaware will host a panel titled “Deemphasizing Peer Groups: What’s Next?” from 9:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m., Thursday, April 11, in Clayton Hall on UD’s Laird Campus.

The program will review the utility of using peer group benchmarking in setting executive compensation with a specific focus on what other factors should be considered by a compensation committee if peer group benchmarking is deemphasized.  Continue Reading →

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Corporate Directors Forum – Day 2

This is the last in my series on the Corporate Directors Forum 2013. See materials, slideshowCorporate Directors Forum 2013: Bonus Session, and Corporate Directors Forum 2013 – Day 1, Part 1, and Corporate Directors Forum: Day 1, Part 2. The program was subject to the Chatham House Rule, so there will be little in the way of attribution below but I hope to provide some sense of the discussion. I throw in a lot of opinions. Some are those of panelists, some are mine, and some came from the audience. Continue Reading →

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Director-Shareholder Engagement – Limits and Possibilities

Board/Shareholder engagement is a topic receiving increased attention in the US.  Many governance organizations and experts have been discussing this topic in an attempt to highlight the issues and challenges that have been expressed by the various constituencies including the directors, institutional shareholders (both US and global), activist shareholders, corporate management, regulators, Continue Reading →

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