Tag Archives | engagement

Call for Papers: Critical Issues for Boards & Institutional Investors

WeinbergCtrThe John L. Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance of the Alfred Lerner College of Business & Economics at the University of Delaware will host a Corporate Governance Symposium on March 15, 2016.  The focus of the Symposium will be “Critical Issues for Boards & Institutional Investors in 2016.”  The Symposium will feature up to four academic papers on corporate governance and a panel discussion featuring speakers from the Delaware judiciary, academic, business and legal communities.  The John L. Weinberg Corporate Governance Best Paper Award will be presented during the symposium luncheon.    Continue Reading →

Continue Reading ·

Video Friday: Triple Feature on Shareholder Engagement

Engagement is, or should be, the common theme of our three videos. CalPERS argues it gives them a seat at the table. Professor Damodaran extols the importance of engagement as a possibility. As a shareholder, what avenues are open? In Davos, I think they looked through the wrong lens. Instead of engagement, they focused on an assumed end-goal that rules out other human values. Continue Reading →

Continue Reading ·

Sustainable, Responsible, Impact Investing: Part 2

Sustainable, Responsible, Impact InvestingThis is the second in a multi-part series on the 25th annual SRI Conference on Sustainable, Responsible, Impact Investing held November 9–11, 2014 at The Broadmoor in Colorado Springs.

See also Video Friday: What is Sustainable, Responsible, Impact Investing?Violating Indigenous Peoples’ Rights Increases Industry Risks, Surveys: Nonprofit Board Members & SRI 2014 Conference AttendeesSustainable, Responsible, Impact Investing: Part 1. The Agenda page of the Conference site now has links to video, audio and presentation slides.  Continue Reading →

Continue Reading ·

Faith-Based Investing: Believers Engaging the Boardroom

The following guest post comes from Usman Hayat, was published by the CFA Institute on 13 February 2013, and is republished here with permission. 

Why, how, and to what effect do faith-based investors engage with companies to seek positive social and environmental change? A recent report, “Believers in the Boardroom: Religious Organizations and Their Shareholder Engagement Practices” by International Interfaith Investment Group (3iG), addresses this question.

The report offers case studies from three faith-based investors — Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate, Church of England, and Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust — who lobbied financial giants such as Goldman Sachs (GS) and Bank of America (BAC), to varying degrees of success. Continue Reading →

Continue Reading ·

Active Ownership Increases Corporate Returns

Elroy Dimson, Oguzhan Karakas, and Xi Li analyze an extensive proprietary database of corporate social responsibility engagements with US public companies over 1999–2009. Engagements address environmental, social, and governance concerns. They are followed by a one-year abnormal return that averages 1.8%, comprising 4.4% for successful and zero for unsuccessful engagements. Continue Reading →

Continue Reading ·

Director-Shareholder Engagement – Limits and Possibilities

Board/Shareholder engagement is a topic receiving increased attention in the US.  Many governance organizations and experts have been discussing this topic in an attempt to highlight the issues and challenges that have been expressed by the various constituencies including the directors, institutional shareholders (both US and global), activist shareholders, corporate management, regulators, Continue Reading →

Continue Reading ·

Increased Investor Engagement

The first comprehensive analysis of the engagement between investors and public U.S. corporate issuers finds a notably high and increasing trend of engagement.  Yet, there is a disconnect between investors and issuers in basic areas such as the time frame of engagement, the definition of a successful engagement and, by implication, what engagement itself means.

“The State of Engagement Between U.S. Corporations and Shareholders,” commissioned by the IRRC Institute and conducted by Institutional Shareholder Services Inc., reveals that engagement is either a priority or a non-event for investors:  asset owners and asset managers were most likely to report either that they had engaged with more than ten companies in the previous year, or that they had not engaged at all.

A power shift is underway and issuers are now more willing to engage.  Nearly nine out of ten public companies report having had at least one engagement with its investors during the prior year. Previously, routine engagement referred to quarterly discussions about earnings and corporate strategy that occurred in company-designed forums such as conference calls and analyst meetings.  Today, engagement has become a year-round exercise involving dialogue on topics such as executive compensation, boardroom independence, and sustainability through a variety of channels including conference calls, meetings, e-mails, public announcements, telephone calls, and regulatory filings. The report’s key findings are as follows:

  • The level of engagement between issuers and investors is high. Approximately 87% of issuers, 70% of asset managers and 62% of asset owners reported at least one engagement in the past year.
  • The level of engagement is increasing. Some 53% of asset owners, 64% of asset managers, and 50% of issuers said they are engaging more.  Virtually none of the investors and only 6% of issuers responded that engagement is decreasing.
  • Amongst investors, engagement is either a priority or a non-event.  A bimodal, or “barbell,” distribution was evident, with 28% of asset owners and 34% of asset managers reporting engagements with more than ten companies. On the other hand, about 45% of asset owners and 43% of asset managers indicated they did not initiate any engagement activity whatsoever.
  • Despite the headlines that result from high-profile conflicts between issuers and investors, the vast majority of engagements between issuers and investors are never made public. About 80% of issuers said most engagements remain private, as did 72% of asset owners and 62% of asset managers.
  • Asset owners, asset investors, and issuers do not always agree on what constitutes “successful” engagement. While all three groups believed constructive dialogue on a specific issue was a success, issuers were materially more likely than investors to think that establishment of a contentious dialogue was a success. An even more dramatic difference was that about three quarters of both asset managers and asset owners defined either additional corporate disclosures and/or changes in policies as a “success” while only about a third of issuers agreed.
  • Engagement is most likely to lead to concrete change by issuers in areas where shareholders are broadly in agreement, such as declassification of the board of directors or the elimination of poor pay practices, than in areas where shareholders’ views diverge, such as the need for an independent board chair.

The study was conducted as an online survey of approximately 161 institutional investors and 335 issuers based in the United States from March to May 2010, followed by in-depth follow-up telephone interviews with 21 investors and 22 issuers in August and September 2010. For each respondent, the level of engagement was assessed in terms of subject matter, frequency, participants, measurements of success, and impediments. The study also evaluated how the volume and the success of engagement have changed over time and are likely to change in the future. The survey defined engagement broadly – as direct contact between a shareowner and an issuer allowing each respondent some flexibility to define the term. Interview participants were provided anonymity to encourage candor. The full report is available at irrcinstitute.org and issgovernance.com.

Continue Reading ·

Powered by WordPress. Designed by WooThemes