Tag Archives | FundVotes

Real-Time Proxy Voting Disclosure Will Drive Competition

Real-time proxy voting disclosure by big funds could drive competition for investments from individual investors and smaller institutional investors with few resources for proxy analysis. Such disclosures would also go a long way in solving problems raised by Delaware Supreme Court Chief Justice Leo E. StrineLucian Bebchuk, and the Main Street Investors Coalition regarding potential conflicts of interest and/or under/over investment in ESG analysis and advocacy. The cost of real-time proxy voting disclosure would be minimal and may actually save funds money currently spent converting voting files to pdfs.

Real-time disclosure would help customers compare voting records and could drive competition among big funds to vote the predominant values of their customers. For ease of use, Compare CalSTRS’ sortable real-time disclosures with those of State Street Institutional Investment Trust. [Graphic above from Pensions & Investments article, No excuse for fiduciary ignorance, 2/19/2018] Continue Reading →

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MoxyVote.com

MoxyVote.com launched on November 20, 2009 in Beta and has already attracted considerable attention. Philly.com jumped right in with West Chester’s Moxy Vote boosts rebel shareholders on opening day. Cari Tuna did something a little more substantial with her Proxy-Voting Advocates Pool Resources on the Web (WSJ/11/23/09).

Of the systems utilizing the internet to increase retail investor participation in proxy voting by providing guidance on proxy issues from institutional investors, advocates or analysts, MoxyVote.com is the only one attempting to do so as a profit-making business, except perhaps FundVotes and CorpGov.net. The others – Investor Suffrage Movement, ProxyDemocracy.org, Shareowners.org, TransparentDemocracy.org, and VoterMedia.org – are all using some sort of non-profit form.

MoxyVote’s most direct competition at this point is ProxyDemocracy.org and TransparentDemocracy.org. All three systems provide users with information on how others are voting or advocate voting. ProxyDemocracy.org appears to be far ahead at this point with regard to actually being able to look up an individual company and finding recommendations, since they are collecting votes from some very huge funds like CalSTRS and Florida SBA, which own shares in thousands and thousands of companies.

Those reporting or advocating on MoxyVote and TransparentDemocracy.org tend to be smaller, like Calvert Investors or Investors Against Genocide. However, MoxyVote has the distinct advantage of being able to be tied in with your brokerage accounts and by allowing you to vote your shares right through the site. It is the only site that allows users to receive their proxies, obtain guidance from multiple sources and submit their votes all at one place.

Since proxy season isn’t in full swing, I don’t have any proxies to vote right now, so couldn’t test that function yet. However, when we do, another feature I like is that we will be able to see how many voters used MoxyVote to vote how many shares. That’s going to be a powerful tool in building involvement. Yes, you may only be voting 40 shares with the recommendations of Calvert or Change to Win but if you see on the site that 100, 1000, or 10000 others did the same, you begin to see that small votes do add up.

MoxyVote also employs a form of client directed voting (CDV) that allows users to set it and forget it. The CDV system advocated by the Business Roundtable has five choices: always vote for management, always vote against management, abstain, vote in proportion to shareowner vote within my broker, let my broker decide. These feel relatively meaningless to me. MoxyVote allows you to set your voting default to your list of advocates (your trusted “brands“). Right now, I’ve got mine ranked as follows:

  1. Investor Environmental Health Network
  2. Center for Political Accountability
  3. Change to Win
  4. Calvert Investments
  5. Boston Common Asset Management

Therefore, I could set up my account so that four days before the meeting, my stock is voted as recommended by IEHN. If IEHN has no recommendation by then, it is voted per the recommendation of CPA. If CPA has nothing, then it looks to CtW and on down the line until one of my advocates has a position. If none do, I can set the default position to vote with management, against them or abstain. If I elect to abstain, MoxyVote withholds my votes from director nominees.

For individual shareowners, MoxyVote provides access to various information sources, the convenience if automated voting and the ability to align your votes with those supporting like-minded organizations. For shareowner advocates, it appears to be a cost-effective way to get out their message and recruit new members with similar values. Once the site begins to attract a large following, corporate management may also see value in getting involved. They could use the site to communicate with owners and potential owners, as a listening post to get a sense of where their retail investors stand on various issues, and in helping them meet quorum requirements.

I encourage readers to try all three of these sites: MoxyVote’s, ProxyDemocracy.org and TransparentDemocracy.org. Please let me know what you think of each.

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