Tag Archives | JPMorgan Chase

Glass Lewis 2018 Proxy Advice Update

Glass Lewis 2019 proxy advice updates address many issues. See 2019 Proxy Paper Guidelines: An Overview of the Glass Lewis Approach to Proxy Advice.

I have reproduced much of the summary of changes below, leaving off the section discussing clarifying amendments. One that stands out for our small group of so-called ‘gadflies’ addresses our concern that several boards hijacked shareholder proposals this past season by seeking ratification of existing policies and the exclusion of a shareholder proposal though a no-action request. In an email, John Chevedden noted the following: Continue Reading →

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William Steiner, Shareholder Activist

William Steiner recently became the most experienced shareholder activist alive to win majority votes for shareholder proposals at public companies. A few months ago, he celebrated 40 years of shareholder activism with an overwhelming victory at Haemonetics Corporation (HAE). The following is based on an interview with Mr. Steiner by his son, Kenneth Steiner, who works with his father to carry on what has become a family legacy. Continue Reading →

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Commonsense Principles: Ground Floor

Commonsense Principles of Corporate Governance. JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon and a group of influential leaders in business and finance have joined to develop a set of "commonsense" principles that institutional investors and governance advisers are mostly applauding. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images and used by Washington Post)

JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon and a group of influential leaders in business and finance have joined to develop a set of “commonsense” principles that institutional investors and governance advisers are mostly applauding. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images and used by Washington Post)

The so-called Commonsense Principles of Corporate Governance are posted here mostly for my future reference, since I don’t know how long others will keep them on the internet. The authors are no radicals, but are a group of 13 executives from the country’s largest public companies and institutional investors… very much mainstream CEOs. Almost half hold both CEO and chair positions, a practice many investors consider bad corporate governance. The Commonsense Principles are supposed to “provide a basic framework for sound, long-term oriented governance” at public companies. Continue Reading →

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JPMorgan Chase (JPM): Proxy Voting Recommendations

JPMorgan I don’t hold shares of JPMorgan Chase (JPM) in my portfolio but the shareholder proposals that will be voted this year deal with crucial issues that will come up at many other companies this proxy season. I received the following letter from shareholders urging readers to vote for a proposal requesting a report on lobbying at JPMorgan Chase and thought it worth your attention, especially given that I had already blogged about a resolution seeking to end government service golden parachutes also to be voted at JPMorgan Chase, as well as voted collected by ProxyDemocracy.org. I would vote in favor of all the shareholder proposals, if I owned the stock. Continue Reading →

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Walden to Present Chamber Resolution on Floor of AGMs

Investors have been urging companies serving on the Board of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce (“the Board”) to reevaluate their role on the Board. They point to a significant disconnect between the companies’ public commitment to corporate responsibility and sustainability and the Chamber’s aggressive lobbying and political spending against issues ranging from climate change legislation to healthcare reform.

In January, forty-four investors with $43 billion in assets wrote to nearly three dozen companies with representation on the Chamber Board. In March, a dozen investors led by Walden Asset Management began implementation of a new strategy to encourage companies to review their role on the Chamber Board – moving resolutions from the floor of annual stockholder meetings.

While shareholder resolutions submitted for company proxy statements under Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) rules are a common occurrence, under company bylaws investors are also able to propose a resolution to be moved from the floor for action at the stockholder meeting. These resolutions can be much more direct and specific than resolutions submitted under SEC rules.

To date, floor resolutions addressing Chamber Board membership have been submitted this proxy season to 3M Company, ConocoPhillips, CVS Caremark, Eastman Kodak, JPMorgan Chase and Pfizer. More resolutions are Continue Reading →

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